Dog killer Michael Vick back in NFL because Coach Andy Reid is a crap parent

Aug 14, 2009 by     31 Comments    Posted under: Culture, Life



Michael Vick Dog Fighter and Killer signed by Andy Reid of Philadelphia Eagles

What if this was your best friend?

Yes, there are some things people do that make them wholly unsuitable to be in high-profile positions, particularly ones that children look up to.   Not for Philadelphia Eagles coach Andy Reid, who signed dog killer Michael Vick up to his team.  Why?  Because Coach Reid did a bad job raising his own children, so he has sympathy for Vile Vick:

Eagles coach Andy Reid has got three sons. Two of them you could say have been trouble. Both have spent time in the slammer. One of them, a drug dealer, slammed his car into another back in 2007 while he was enjoying a little heroin. The other one pointed a handgun at a fellow driver when the two squared off over something.

Having these guys in his life, Reid apparently has first-hand knowledge of how people can turn their lives around and this supposedly helped him to push for the signing of Michael Vick(notes), according to the Philadelphia Inquirer. “I’m a believer that as long as people go through the right process, they deserve a second chance,” Reid told the paper. “Michael has done that.”

Okay, so Andy Reid and his poor parenting skills raised some crappy children, so he gives a chance to an amoral asshole like Michael Vick.  There is no evidence his kids have turned their lives around, but whatever.  From PETA:

PETA and millions of decent football fans around the world are disappointed that the Philadelphia Eagles have chosen to sign a man who hanged dogs from trees, electrocuted them with jumper cables, held them underwater until they drowned in his swimming pool, and even threw his own family dogs into the fighting pit to be torn to shreds while he laughed. What sort of message does this send to young fans who care about animals and don’t want to see them be harmed?

I don’t know who is worse:  Coach Andy Reid and his beastly brood, or the Philadelphia football commentators who only care that Michael Vick might help the Eagles WIN!  Because…there’s nothing more important:

Peter King at Sports Illustrated:

Getting back into a locker room with a solid core of players was more important. Hmmm. Stability. Erasing his past. Smart offensive scheme. Unconcerned about playing time.

That’s why the signing of Vick by the Eagles Thursday night makes more sense than Vick to almost anywhere else.

[....]

If there are dog-lovers protesting Vick’s signing because of his heinous dog-fighting history and convictions (and there are bound to be some), they’ll roll off Reid. He simply won’t care.

Paul “Vick signing is ‘a terrific move’ for Eagles” Domowitch, The Philadelphia Daily News:

Reid may have a few faults as a coach, but he is one of the best play-designers in the NFL. Give him 5 minutes, a pen and a cocktail napkin and he’ll give you a play defenses can’t stop.

He is all about creating mismatches. A safety on a swift wide receiver like DeSean Jackson. A linebacker on Brian Westbrook. Now he’s got Vick, who he can line up anywhere in the formation; who can throw the ball, run with it, even catch it.

Rich Hoffman, The Philadelphia Daily News:

Vick committed a terrible, repugnant crime involving a dogfighting ring that he bankrolled. After his time in jail, he spent time in home confinement. There is a chance the NFL will not reinstate him until the sixth week of the season (although it could be earlier). But there is no legal reason he should not be able to play again. Second chances are an American tradition, some say an American obsession. Vick deserves his as much as anyone.

Second comes the football part of the equation and this truth: The player can assist the Eagles. Not lead – assist.

Enrico Campitelli, the 700 Level:

Do I love the move? No, not really. Do I hate it? No, not really. But the more I think about it, the more exciting the prospect of mixing Michael Vick into the offense a few plays a game becomes. I’m willing to give the guy a second chance at least until he does something stupid once again.

Philadelphia’s sports sector has officially repulsed the nation.  Hey Philly – as long as your team might win, that’s all that matters, right?  Perhaps Andy Reid would sign Hitler as his running back if he had the right moves, and Philly’s sports commentators like Paul Domowitch would see the bright side.

Vick signing is ‘a terrific move’ for Eagles




31 Comments + Add Comment

  • What he did to those dogs is absolutely deplorable, I don’t think anybody anywhere is arguing that. At question here are two important things: (1) Did Vick “learn his lesson” and become repentant about what he has done, and (2) will he take this opportunity and his place in the national spotlight to try to set things right?

    A lot of people say “it doesn’t matter because what happened to those poor dogs cannot be undone”, and to a point that is true. However, if we don’t care about the person who comes out the other side, why do we use things like jailtime and other punishments? If we don’t expect a person to become a better person after them, why aren’t all criminals given life in prison? Or, if a criminal can never become anything more then a criminal, why not just kill them? There is a fundamental societal belief (even if there isn’t a lot of supporting scientific evidence in all cases) that prison and punishment “reform” criminals.

    The second point is, I think, the most important. Vick did some terrible things. However, and forgive my liberal bleeding heart, he was raised in a way that prevented him from realizing it. How many nice, polite people still hold on to antiquated notions like racial inequality simply because that idea was drilled into their heads as they grew? We can’t expect things to be any different for people who grow up around drug use, spousal abuse, or even animal abuse. That said, Vick has an opportunity now that he has apparently realized his mistake to set things right: He can use his history and his money and his place in the public spotlight to become a powerful force for the humane treatment of animals. If he were so inclined (and I sincerely hope he is) he could become the single most influential person in that whole movement. Sometimes a sinner can rise to become the highest saint.

    In summary, two things: (1) I have to believe that a single mistake, or even a small lifetime of mistakes do not irretrievably doom a man forever (2) hope that going forward he does everything in his now-considerable power to change things for the better.

    • Andrew, I understand where you are coming from, but I’m also concerned about America’s obsession with “second chances” and “comebacks” that it trumps some truly horrific things people do. I’m not arguing for Michael Vick to never have another life, but I think he does not deserve to be in the public eye anymore, particularly as someone that children follow and look up to.

      You’re right – Vick could become an effective spokesperson for the humane treatment of animals. But I’m not about to assume that is the way he is going to go.

      Do you remember Jayson Blair? He was the disgraced New York Times reporter who was simply fabricating his stories. He fundamentally hurt that newspaper. Does he deserve a second chance at reporting factual news? I don’t think so. What’s he doing now? He’s a life coach, not a reporter. That’s great!

      Vick deserves another life, not to simply return to the one he had before when he hurt so many living creatures, without any notion of how craven and awful his actions were. This wasn’t a single mistake, but one repeated, with many animals, over years. There were *hundreds* of mistakes he committed. I agree with Joel Schwartzenberg about how unsatisfying has been Vick’s response:

      Most of Vick’s statements so far, including wanting to be “part of the solution” and that he “won’t disappoint” just do not measure up.

      When Vick says he wants another chance, kids need to hear WHY.
      When Vick says he promises to do better, kids need to hear HOW
      When Vick says what he did was wrong, kids need to know HOW WRONG.

      Until then, he’ll be seen as just another guy who made a mistake — perhaps a fumbled snap — and now wants to move past it. But it bears repeating: What Michael Vick did is not a mistake; it’s an abhorrence.

      Jayson Blair doesn’t deserve another career in journalism; Rod Blagojevich doesn’t deserve another career in politics (nor does Marion Barry); and Michael Vick doesn’t deserve another career in professional football.

  • You’re right David, but I think you’re missing another factor. Vick paid his time, and is going to be paying for this mistake in the form of public ridicule for the rest of his public life. If he wanted the easy way out I imagine that he could have gone private and hidden himself from the slings and arrow that have been directed at him, and will be for the rest of his life.

    I don’t know what’s going on inside his head. Is he some evil animal abuser to the core who is only faking repentance to get back into a lucrative job? Maybe. Is he some ignorant, barely-literate jackoff who simply can’t formulate what his feelings, plans and emotions are? It’s entirely possible (especially when you consider the way star athletes are coddled through college). Is he sincerely sorry for his actions and is a transformed man now who will spend the rest of his life doing only the greater good? I doubt you believe that, but it has to be a slim possibility. The fact is that we don’t know what’s going on inside his head and I suggest that we should not condemn him based on assumptions or possibilities here. We know for certain only what he has done and what he says now, and we can watch intently to see where things go from here.

    I do not like what the guy did; I would absolutely never condone abusing animals like that. If he demonstrates himself to be incapable of reform I will be the first to call for his head on a platter. But if he is capable, and if he does reform and become a better person, and if he uses his place in the spotlight to do good things, then we should be accepting of that (though I doubt anybody would be applauding it).

    Vick stood in front of a jury of his peers, was convicted and sentenced, sent to jail, and then spent time under house arrest. He was given exactly the penalty that we, the outraged public, saw fit to give him. And if that wasn’t enough to wash away his crimes then we have nobody to blame but ourselves. He took the punishment that we gave him and came out the other side, where he gets the opportunity to demonstrate himself an improved man. With every opportunity there are possibilities for success or failure, but it’s up to him to choose between these two, not for you or I to do it for him.

    • Yes, but Andrew, at what point does a person commit such an aborrhent act that they no longer deserve a place in the public sphere? If Michael Vick was just some office lackey like an accountant, it would be a different story. But he’s returning to a high-profile position, where Eagles fans who find what he did to be beyond the comprehensible stretch of humanity most of us posses, who are now in an uncomfortable position to have to cheer for this man/this team.

      Drug problems, divorces, affairs, etc. – these are all things I think people get too hung up on when judging other people. These are common human failings. Brutalizing, ripping the flesh of other creatures, making them fight for their lives…that’s a little different.

      So what would Michael Vick have had to do in order to have lost the privilege to entertain the public? If this act doesn’t qualify (it was only a few years back, not decades), what does?

      It would also be interesting to see how many football fans who think Michael Vick deserves another chance feel that former New Jersey Governor Jim McGreevey should forever remain condemned, even as he really *does* start a new, admirable life.

  • Considering that animal abuse at this scale is so horrendous, I don’t think there are any worse crimes which I would point to and say “above this level, if he’s done his time in prison, he can’t play football anymore”. I say this with full knowledge that some prison terms are so long that they preclude a person from ever playing useful football after they have concluded.

    The distinction about whether his career puts him into the public sphere or not is an arbitrary one. It’s not the career that keeps him in the public sphere, even if his career put him there in the first place. Look at famous-for-being-famous celebrities, who are in the public sphere regardless of their complete lack of motivated careers. Saying that Michael Vick can’t play football anymore isn’t going to make him any less visible to the public eye.

    Can’t play football? Maybe he’ll just be famous for something else: a reality TV show, a tell-all memoir, repeated appearances on television shows and news broadcasts, etc. Again, he’s already famous, and telling him that he can’t play football anymore won’t change that. If anything he’ll become a martyr.

    You mentioned the kids earlier. What’s the lesson they take away from all this? Is it that you make bad decisions and you’re fucked for life? Stigmatize anybody who’s ever done something wrong until the day they die? That you abuse animals and your only punishment is that you can’t play football anymore? Or, do we take Michael Vick, salvage his sorry wreck of a life, transform him into a better man and say “Look at this man, who did horrible things but was punished and “? Don’t tell him that he can’t play football and that he has to just take a different job and get on with his life: Demand that he play football and that he lives up to the generosity and expectations that come with his second chance. Demand that he spend every waking moment of the rest of his life desperately clawing his way back into our good graces.

    Barring him from playing football is the same as saying “it’s okay to be the same evil jackoff you were before, just do it in private so the kids can’t see you”. Letting him play again says “You’re under intense scrutiny now, and the world is going to watch your every move and demand nothing less then absolute perfection from you”. Don’t say that he can’t be a role model anymore, demand from him that he become a great one.

    • Would you feel the same way if he was a convicted pedophile? Murderer? Rapist?

      Would you say the same for sports stars convicted of doping?

      I’m not saying your defense is invalid, but the logic you are using can be applied to other areas that it begs the question: what is the line? Why is it that the lesson Michael Vick imparts to children is not the one you write above, but instead: you can do things that are pretty horrific, but don’t worry – you’ll get a chance at a comeback and you only need to seem contrite.

  • You don’t need to “just seem contrite”. He plead guilty, went to prison, spent time under house arrest, and had his career pretty much ruined. Maybe it wasn’t all as much as he deserved, but it’s more then just feigning apology. And it’s not a comeback he’s getting: it’s a life of intense public scrutiny and criticism. He’s not going to be a superstar again, but he may be able to prove himself a decent human being.

    There’s a difference between a person who does something wrong in his job, and a person who does something wrong in his personal life (at least, in my mind). Rod Balgojevich did something wrong under his authority as a governor, so now he shouldn’t be a governor. Mary Kay Letourneau screwed up as a teacher, now she can’t be a teacher. Scooter Libby screwed up in a courtroom, and now he can’t be a lawyer. Vick’s crime had nothing to do with his career (excepting how his abnormally-large paycheck probably helped grease the wheels). Taking away his job doesn’t take away his ability to participate in dog fighting again, in the same way that taking away Blagojevich’s job prevents him from selling senate seats.

    If Vick was a pedophile, murder, or rapist, plead guilty and served his prison sentence AND at the end of that was miraculously in condition to play football again he should be given the opportunity to do that (while I lead an angry mob to the courthouse to complain about the relaxed sentences for murderers/rapists/pedophiles). He serves his due sentence and comes out the other side with the opportunity to be a better person. If the sentence isn’t long enough to satisfy our anger, then that’s a problem between the judge and the jury, but doesn’t change the fact that Vick served the punishment that was handed to him.

  • This situation makes me uncomfortable — mostly because on whichever side of the issue that I perch, I find that I am uncomfortable.

    However, I think it is probably true that if we do not give people a chance to redeem, improve, change — whatever you want to call it – then, frankly, they won’t. They’ll remain the disgusting, nasty people that they were before — because that’s what everyone expects and they have nothing to gain from doing anything else. Personally, I don’t care if they change inside – just act nice around people, animals, etc. That’s all I can ask for.

    As I have often said, EVERYTHING we do is based on greed. When we help someone we do it not because we like helping people, but because we like the way it FEELS to help people. We don’t change because of some greater good — we change because changing gets us something we want. It’s the same with Vick. He wants his career back – he wants to be known as a nice guy and not a monster.

    I really don’t care what the motivation is — if it makes people act better – then, let’s give it a try. The alternative really is much less pleasant in the end.

    As for Reid . . . considering the way he’s handled the family thing – there’s no good example there to follow. But, at least Vick has Dungy.

  • Andrew’s point about the purpose of jail is interesting, but it’s not based on reality. It is a fact that recidivism is more likely to occur than Michael Vick just “turning his life around”. In fact, the one thing our jails are good for is teaching criminals how to perfect their trade and how to not get caught. They network inside, and they come out harder than before. In theory jail is for rehabilitation, but it just doesn’t work that way.

    Now factor in the kind of person that you’d have to be to participate in the activities that Vick was a part of…..and I really doubt he can “change”. Vick wasn’t some poor ignorant soul who didn’t know that it hurts dogs when they fight. Vick is a guy who derives pleasure from causing pain in others. Animals were just an easy target. I’d even go as far as to say that this guy probably has as little value for human life as he does for animal life, he just knows he can’t overstep that bound without doing real hard time. Vick isn’t changing, but he surely knows where his bread’s buttered. He’ll pretend he’s changed, he’ll stay out of the scene but I don’t believe for one minute that jail has changed him.

    I tell you what….if the guy has changed so very much, then perhaps he ought to pledge something like 80% of his salary to charities that help animals. Maybe then the Eagles could justify it’s offer and the NFL could save some face.

    And I also think the fact that Vick “did his time” confuses the issues. The government imposes penalties for bad behavior but it can only go so far. However, the private sector is different. It has the power to make a bigger difference, and one that lasts a lot longer. The private sector isn’t bound by concepts of double jeopardy. If we think a guy’s reprehensible, we don’t have to hire him, or have him represent what we’re all about. There’s a lot of power in that. It’s a shame the Eagles don’t get that concept.

  • Spilling coffee on a tablecloth is a mistake. The premeditated torture and murder of dogs is NOT a mistake. Stop this crap about people learning from their mistakes – if Vick’s actions were conducted against children, he would be serving life in prison.

  • I have to side with Samantha and Phil. We are really talking about handing back Michael Vick his career after a short period away, and I think people in the public eye who commits such violent, vicious acts, don’t deserve our attention spans. Nor the cheers of crowds.

    I don’t think he’s reformed, I think it’s part of who he is. If someone told me that I would lose my millions-a-year career forever unless I went around saying that I hated my mother, I might go around saying I hate my mom. That doesn’t mean I’d feel that way, and not let her know what the deal was.

    Some things are part of people’s natures, and millions will make most anyone say whatever they think you want to hear.

  • I am beyond repulsed that any team would even take the time to entertain the idea of giving Michael Vick a second chance. Unfortunately, it is a cold truth that he is being rewarded for paying a penance in legal terms because he served a sentence.

    Does anyone remember the initial raid on Michael Vick’s home in Virginia? I believe around 60 dogs were seized (mostly pitbulls), there was blood stains, and even a dog fighting ring. Vicks take on the situation was classic of someone of his mentality. He just did not know it was going on there? Pleasssssse! Michael Vick had a well know reputation for being a big spender and player within the low life dog fighting communities. I have always wondered what other professional athletes were involved with Michael Vick. I am sure there were a few.

    Remember this quote by the NFL during the investigation????? “Dog fighting is cruel, degrading, and illegal. We support a thorough investigation into any allegations of this type of activity. Any NFL employee proved to be involved in this type of activity will be subject to prompt and significant discipline under our personal conduct policy.”

    Yet, here we are today. Watching this moron getting a million dollar contract because he served his time. Another great role model! Maybe Tru T.V. should wait for O.J. get released and he can be an expert advisor on murder trials! How the standards of the American culture just keep sinking lower and lower!

  • I’ve always found it to be ridiculous that for some reason athletes and musicians have to be held at some sort of superior moral standing than the rest of people. Listen, many of you may feel strong dislike or even hate Michael Vick, but he has served his time and punishment as according to the law, hence he’s a free man. He also was one of the best quarterbacks in the league at the time, so if can still play at a certain high level then I don’t see why his behavior off the field should be held against him. So what, now everyone that has a criminal record should not be allowed to find a job anymore? Come one now…

    As well, what I even find more laughable even even illogic is to bring in middle of this even Head Coach Reid’s parenting skills not even as if Reid had hired Vick as a nanny to his kids, rather just because you are upset he allowed Vick to join his team. Seriously, what do his qualities as a father have to do with anything here? His job as a head coach is to put together and prepare the best team possible, and if he feels adding Vick to the roster will boost the Eagles’ chances of success, then it should be his job to recommend the ownership to sign him. Doing otherwise would be irresponsible. My only doubts would be if Vick’s long inactivity may have made him a bit unfit, and what could possibly the way the players respond to Vick’s presence (though I’d imagine Reid would have already had a discussion with the team before). Other than that, that Vick is a “criminal” or a “monster” should be nearly irrelevant.

    At the end of the day, Vick’s life will likely go on, while many of you will still be out there angry, upset, outraged by a man you likely don’t even know personally. I don’t condone any of his behavior, and as a matter of fact I was glad he was sent to jail for his crimes, but now that he’s out, he deserves the rights and freedoms we all share.

  • Jacob, what Reid’s poor parenting skills had to do with it is that they influenced his decision, as was made clear in virtually every news story:

    Reid also admitted that his personal life influenced his strong feelings about Vick, referring to the arrests of his two sons, Britt and Garrett, on drug charges.

    “I’ve seen people that are close to me who have had second chances that have taken advantage of those,” Reid said. “It’s very important that people give them an opportunity to change, so we’re doing that with Michael. The other side of that is we’re getting one of the best football players in the league.”

  • Vick should be made to clean up dog excrement as his job for 20 years. Nothing about the slap on the wrist he was given served as sufficient punishment for torturing and killing innocent animals.

  • I agree with you Luigi. Dogs are not cunning, they are not manipulative, they love you no matter what, as long as you love them. They want nothing but the best for you, and they are always happy to see you.

    They have none of the worst of human emotions, and many of the best (love, loyalty, etc.) Their innocence makes their abuse and torture, in my opinion, the moral equivalent of harming a baby.

    • Except a baby is human. Dogs are not.

  • This is a great discussion, and reflects my own mixed feelings about this. I am glad to see that other people are digging as deeply into the moral questions this story raises as I am.

    To me, it pretty much centers on this: in his “comeback” interviews, Vick described growing up in a dog fighting culture, and never having reason to really question it. He talked about times the police would knowingly turn their attention away from dog fighting events, rather than making arrests, and how that contributed to making him feel the practice was acceptable. He talked about his regret for failing to take a stand as he grew older.

    Now, he said all of this after retaining top-tier public relations people and lawyers. So it’s difficult to know how much sincerity underlies his words.

    And that’s the challenge for me. What he said, if true, reflects a person who grew up in a genuinely challenging environment, and is genuinely trying to grow through his experience. If that’s the case, I am perfectly willing to accept the concept of a “second chance.”

    But we just have no way of knowing if it’s true, or if it’s just a bunch of carefully-tailored rhetoric aimed at protecting a multi-million dollar contract.

    Beyond that, I just find my thinking running around in circles.

  • By the way, a small but maybe important detail: I think the photo on this post is not Michael Vick’s dog. The blog post it’s pulled from never states directly that it is, and links to the following page: http://www.usanimalprotection.org/gypsy.htm

    That page is about animal abuse in general, and makes no mention of Vick.

    • Pete, you appear to be correct. The pit bull pictured, “Gypsy“, is apparently one of the few specimens of what happens to dogs in the fighting rings. Gypsy has apparently been paired with Michael Vick continuously (1, 2, 3, 4, 5…)

      Once again, a good illustration that one should not just follow the crowd blindly.

  • Open Letter to Michael Vick,
    I am a 64year old Caucasian Male,with a lifetime of fistfights to my name.I have a beautiful,huge German Shepherd named Logan.I love my dogs,since Nam.
    Make me Commish and you would be “inside,”for life.
    U.S.Army Ranger Ret.
    Dan

  • There are no words strong enough to state the disgust I have for Michael Vick and everyone like him. If he isn’t actually participating in fighting now, he is funding it somewhere, I bet. I bet he watches dog fighting on videos all the time. Is it true they are changing their name to The Philadelphia Dog Killers?

  • I, too, use a pit-bull who stands out as the most loving animal I’ve ever owned. Soon, a new dog breed will can come along for that media to blast, as they have done rotties and dobies in earlier years. Unfortunate that media sensationalism breeds a lot inaccurate info.

  • This is old news. But back in December Vick was honored with the Ed Block Courage Award. An award given to him by HIS Eagles teammates. Disgusting! Another example of pro athletes being disconnected from common sense and reality.

    http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/blog/shutdown_corner/post/Eagles-players-honor-Michael-Vick-with-award-for?urn=nfl,210601

  • Im Sorry, I know nothing about American football, I live in England, so cant comment on how great he is, to be honest ive never heard of the guy, but anyone who commits such vile acts against a living thing for “fun” doesnt deserve any sort of life. One of the people commenting on here states if those dogs were children hed be serving life sentences.

    Which obviously leads us to the fundamental point that is totally wrong with the world; a dogs life is less important than a persons life, thus he can kill hundreds of dogs and gets a sentence of 23 months in prison.

    joe bloggs goes out and kills a rapist tomorrow and gets caught hes either facing life in prison or a death sentence in your country.

    Michael Vick is sick in the head, there are some actions that in my eyes can not be attoned for and should in fact “doom a man for life” taking into account what andrew states, i believe the world would be a much better place if criminals were just disposed of, as they never learn. More often than not someone commits a crime, gets caught, does time, gets out and then continues the cycle, the only difference is they get better at the crimes and dont get caught as much with experience. I dont believe anyone deserves a second chance; when it comes to murder/torture/rape/ of any living thing animals or people, alongside child abuse all of which should be punishable by death.

    before any one gets in here with the whole “does that mean we cant slaughter animals for food argument” There are of course some animals that are slaughtered for food purposes, and obviously theres a distinction between hanging a dog or electricuting a dog or drounding it in your swiming pool for “fun” and say slaughtering a cow in the most humain way possible for meat to eat.

    Anyway I hope the guy is a total failure and gets what is coming to him; maybe someone will treat him the same way he treat his dogs “just for fun”

  • to the author of this stupid article;

    actually..speaking on behalf of 99% of eagles fans..we dont care what vick did in the past, becasue we are, in fact winning..vick did his time, and has come out of it an entirely different person, and after this article i hope he plays himself right into the “hall of fame”

    as for the whole andy reid is a bad parent thing..that just makes you look like a bad person calling into question andy’s parenting skills when you dont know the situation surrounding his kids..what you know are the bad choices they made (and your facts above are actually wrong by the way)..you werent present for those issues with his son, so to call him a bad parent is just ignorant and lazy

  • “to the author of this stupid article;

    actually..speaking on behalf of 99% of eagles fans..we dont care what vick did in the past, becasue we are, in fact winning..”

    Um…are you not in fact reinforcing the author’s point of the article:

    “Hey Philly – as long as your team might win, that’s all that matters, right?”

  • Well looking back on this, Vick has learned his lesson. He’s turning his life around, repaying his life around, and getting back to football. I’m glad to see his success now. In my opinion, what he did was wrong, but he has learned his lesson, and deserves to be a free man.

    If you don’t forgive him, that’s fine. But you have to admit it was a smart move for a coach like Andy Reid to bring this guy and help him in his life. The author of this calling his parenting skills into question is just wrong. Reid’s kids knowingly made bad decisions beyond his control. It has nothing to do with his parenting skills.

    And hey, maybe if you spent time with Michael Vick and Andy Reid, you’d learn that they aren’t as bad as you people make them to be.

  • Holy Crap!

    http://www.mediaite.com/tv/tucker-carlson-says-michael-vick-should-have-been-executed-video/

    Tucker Carlson: “I Think Personally [Michael Vick] Should Have Been Executed”

  • I think this son of a bitch should be beaten the way this poor baby was and as far this couch he should be beat too!

  • What he did to those dogs is absolutely deplorable, I don’t think anybody anywhere is arguing that. At question here are two important things: (1) Did Vick “learn his lesson” and become repentant about what he has done, and (2) will he take this opportunity and his place in the national spotlight to try to set things right?
    A lot of people say “it doesn’t matter because what happened to those poor dogs cannot be undone”, and to a point that is true. However, if we don’t care about the person who comes out the other side, why do we use things like jailtime and other punishments? If we don’t expect a person to become a better person after them, why aren’t all criminals given life in prison? Or, if a criminal can never become anything more then a criminal, why not just kill them? There is a fundamental societal belief (even if there isn’t a lot of supporting scientific evidence in all cases) that prison and punishment “reform” criminals.
    The second point is, I think, the most important. Vick did some terrible things. However, and forgive my liberal bleeding heart, he was raised in a way that prevented him from realizing it. How many nice, polite people still hold on to antiquated notions like racial inequality simply because that idea was drilled into their heads as they grew? We can’t expect things to be any different for people who grow up around drug use, spousal abuse, or even animal abuse. That said, Vick has an opportunity now that he has apparently realized his mistake to set things right: He can use his history and his money and his place in the public spotlight to become a powerful force for the humane treatment of animals. If he were so inclined (and I sincerely hope he is) he could become the single most influential person in that whole movement. Sometimes a sinner can rise to become the highest saint.
    In summary, two things: (1) I have to believe that a single mistake, or even a small lifetime of mistakes do not irretrievably doom a man forever (2) hope that going forward he does everything in his now-considerable power to change things for the better.

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